I did not lose myself all at once. I rubbed out my face over the years…the same way carvings on stone are worn down by water.  – Amy Tan

We needn’t look far to observe that most very young girls have a strong sense of self or ‘I’dentity — they are connected not just to the world, but to themselves. My friend Rebecca has a daughter who brims with a sense of self; perhaps that’s why I find her so winning.

And why too I can’t pull myself away from this Minerva Teichert painting.

In their jubilant dancing, I see ‘I’dentity bursting forth from women who are connected to themselves.

Teichert Love Story

So many of the women that I know work tirelessly to connect to and care for others, to nurture and foster the ‘I’dentity of husbands, boyfriends, children, parents, siblings, friends, co-workers, community.  We do so, in large measure, because of our deep connection to and love for God.

I’ve observed, however, that we struggle to connect to ourselves.  I think we knew how to at some point, but have forgotten.

The ‘Atta Girl’ is meant to help us to remember.

I do what I do each day because of who I am.  Because the good that I do is often difficult to recognize, and to name, it is sometimes hard for others, and even for me, to value my contribution.  As such, there is a grace and elegance to what I do and who I am which is, in fact, changing the world.

Or, in the words of Albert Einstein, “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.”

If you are still scratching your head about my reasoning behind the “Atta G’I’rl,” you may want to check out the below posts:

 

Throw Down Your Pom-Poms and Get in the Game

 

Martha and Mary

Identity Crisis

Thank Heaven for Little Rachels

When Our Loved Ones Ask, ‘What About Me?’

Valuing What Women Do

Looking for the ‘I’ in the Twilight Series

2017-08-18T13:19:56+00:00 January 17th, 2009|Categories: Dare Dream Do, Personal|Tags: , |
  • EHD

    Minerva Teichert is not only one of my favorite artists. She is also one of my favorite people. I highly recommend “Minerva! The Story of an Artist with a Mission” by Elaine Cannon. While ranching in Wyoming, Teichert refused to relinquish her remarkable talents (trained in NYC), turning her small living room into her studio. When she had mural commissions, she would look at her paintings backwards through binoculars to make sure the perspective would work from a distance. She was a devoted wife, mother, and friend, using proceeds from her paintings to send students from her small town to college. I own a print of her red-robed Christ, which I have yet to frame, but which has a place waiting for it on my dining room wall.