Seeing oneself as acting in a movie or a play is not merely fantasy or indulgence; it is fundamental to how people work out who it is they are, and may becomeBenedict Carey

One of the best ways for us to ‘find our voice’ is to listen to those who have found theirs.  Because so many women, even successful women, find it difficult to claim a central place in their lives and in their own stories, finding self-assured women within our circle of loved ones may be difficult.  It is equally problematic to find women within the annals of literature and film who have moved to the center of their story.

Over the past 2 1/2 years, you’ve occasionally heard voices other than mine.  They are lovely, compelling voices.  In June, you will hear many more.

AshleyG Storytime

Courtesy of AshleyG at Etsy

As we give utterance to our ideas and dreams, we experience the catharsis that comes with saying what we think and feel out loud, especially when there are ears to hear, and we are heard — really heard.

It has been said by a number of psychologists who study recovery from trauma that mourning without empathy leads to madness, and that the person who suffers loss must be able to give testimony to someone as a way of working-through and learning from this loss.  On these pages, we won’t necessarily be speaking of loss, but the principle of ‘being heard’ applies nonetheless.

And by listening to and learning from one another, we will experience systergy.

 

 

2017-08-18T13:19:55+00:00 May 26th, 2009|Categories: Dare Dream Do|Tags: |
  • Whitney,
    It is interesting how things are unfolding. In the last two weeks I have done two large real estate deals and have two more in negotiation. I have learned that the alderwoman in my ward (municipal jurisdiction – not church) has cast her hat into the provincial arena which now opens up her spot. I have met with a few people who could be helpful in a campaign.
    I was so bogged down for the last year with grief, mourning and all the yucky aspects of self-absorption. Some series of events have changed all that: after having talked to you, reading some insightful books, articulating what really matters to me and then listening to some very important lyrics to a song that felt especially and directly from Heaven. I am not yet what I want to be nor capable for being, but I am definitely on the road moving forward.

  • Whitney,
    I’m fairly certain that finding my voice will be my journey. Because it will happen in the everyday. And it will be gradual. At midnight last night, I wanted to bend your ear. I thought about emailing. I blogged instead. I find your posts so compelling, because you’re reaching out with open arms to embrace the need to be heard. As women, we do have that internal need to have others listen. We’re also pretty good at multi-tasking and helping each other (systergy). You’re brilliant. I feel honored to call you friend.

  • I’m excited to read from you and your guest bloggers next month. What a great idea!
    It feels great to stretch and grow in ways that really matter personally, and then to have and offer support and systergy really kicks things up a notch. It’s a great way to live. Thank you for helping me overcome doubt and self-imposed obstacles and being such an inspiration!

  • Nan

    I think as women we get too used to defining ourselves by what we do. “I’m a teacher.” “I’m a mother.” “I’m a wife.” “I’m a daughter.” But on my very best days, I look into the mirror and I see none of the roles I assume, I only see myself as I am.
    I work with a group of young women at church, and lately I’ve been trying to figure out how to give them the gift of being so comfortable in their own skins that they wouldn’t trade places with anyone in the world. It is a process no matter how old you are!