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I am not running the Boston marathon.
After last year's bombing I was determined to run; the terrorists were NOT going to blow up our dreams too.
I started training; by December I was up to 14.5 miles.
I applied to run for the Girl Scouts, but there was only one spot for every ten applicants.
I'll run the New Hampshire marathon in October instead, I thought.
By March, six months into dating this dream,  I realized I no longer wanted to marry it.

2014 Boston Marathon“Winners never quit”, said Vince Lombardi.
But maybe they do.
Says Seth Godin says, “Winners quit all the time. 

[But] they just quit the right stuff at the right time.”

Gregory Miller, an associate professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia, and Carsten Wrosch, associate professor of psychology at Concordia University, have conducted a number of studies on quitting, or disengaging from one's goals. Here's what they found:   “Those who could not renounce hard-to-attain goals showed increased levels of the inflammatory molecule C-reactive protein.  This protein is linked to such health problems as heart disease, diabetes and early aging in adults.”

Further, according to Kathleen D. Vohs, a professor of marketing at the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management people need internal resources to attain their goals, and “if you are a pursuing a goal that is constantly frustrating, you will be less successful in goal attainment in other areas of life.

It's important to dream, and it's important to know when to ditch a dream.

It would be wonderful to run a marathon.
But it would come at a cost.
At the cost of dreams I want more.

What are you willing to quit pursuing so that you can go after what you really want?

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